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COLORECTAL CANCER FACTS

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. In 2020, it accounted for about 9% of all diagnosed cancers in the US.¹

When CRC is detected early, the 5-year survival rate is 90%. When detected late and cancer has spread to distant organs, 5-year survival drops to 13.5%.

9 of 10 people survive colorectal cancer when diagnosed at Stage 1.
1 of 10 people survive colorectal cancer when diagnosed at Stage 4. 
Colorectal Cancer is the most deadly cancer in the US.¹
(A) Only invasive colonoscopies catch CRC early.
(B) Fecal box tests detect later and aren’t preferred by a large number of people.
(C) Current blood test detect too late, are inaccurate and not reimbursed.

REFERENCES

1. National Cancer Institute, “2010 Fact Book,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. http://obf.cancer.gov   [Citation Time(s):2]

WHY SCREENING MATTERS

Early detection saves lives. Data indicate annual screening with mSEPT9 averts more colorectal cancer cases and colorectal cancer deaths.¹

IT CAN HAPPEN TO ANYONE.

Colorectal cancer is a pervasive health concern that can affect individuals across diverse demographics and backgrounds. It’s not confined to a specific age, gender, or ethnic group. Lifestyle factors, genetic predisposition, and environmental influences can all contribute to the development of colorectal cancer. 

WHEN FOUND EARLY, A CURE IS MORE LIKELY.

Early detection of colorectal cancer significantly improves the chances of a cure. Timely intervention through regular screenings identifies potential issues before they advance, leading to more effective treatment and a better prognosis. Prioritizing a healthy lifestyle and routine screenings substantially enhances the likelihood of successful outcomes for individuals facing colorectal cancer.

HAVING CANCER DOESN'T JUST AFFECT YOU.

Cancer’s impact extends beyond the individual, affecting the emotional, financial, and practical aspects of their support network. Loved ones grapple with feelings of concern, caregivers take on additional responsibilities, and families may face financial strains due to medical expenses. Recognizing the collective challenges emphasizes the importance of comprehensive support systems for both the individual with cancer and those supporting them.

REFERENCES

  1. D’Andrea, E., Ahnen, D. J., Sussman, D. A., & Najafzadeh, M. (2020). Quantifying the impact of adherence to screening strategies on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Cancer medicine9(2), 824–836. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2735

WHO SHOULD GET SCREENED

Who is at risk and when should you get screened?

While anyone can get cancer, the lifetime risk for being diagnosed with CRC is about 1 in 20 or 5% for both men and women in the US. Genetics, family history and lifestyle play significant roles for who gets CRC, but the risk becomes greater with age.

Approximately 90% of diagnosed CRC cases and 93% of CRC-related deaths occur in men and women age 50 years and older.

Why getting screened early matters

The goal of CRC screening is to detect early-stage cancers and adenomas while effective intervention and cure are still possible.

What makes screening essential is that the average-risk person may not experience any symptoms or indications that they have cancer.

And because CRC is a stealth disease, early detection relies on screening participation– a good prognosis is directly related to early detection and the timing of diagnosis.

Early detection and treatment are more challenging and often less successful with five-year survival rate drops falling to about 13.0% in late-stage disease.

“For men and women aged 50 and older, screening is the most important step you can take to help protect yourself from colon cancer.”

-American Cancer Society, 2024

WAYS TO GET SCREENED

Colonoscopy

Visual examination of the colon using a flexible tube with a camera. 

Stool Test

Analysis of fecal matter to detect abnormalities or diseases.

Blood Test

Diagnostic examination of blood for health indicators or specific conditions. 

TAKE ACTION AND GET SCREENED

Screening for colorectal cancer is vital because it helps catch potential issues early on by increasing prevention through identifying adenomas and early polyps. This increases the likelihood of successful treatment and improving overall outcomes.

Early detection allows for timely intervention, minimizing the risk of cancer development and promoting better health outcomes. Regular screening is a proactive step to protect your health and potentially prevent the advancement of colorectal cancer.

AFTER YOUR SCREENING

NEGATIVE TEST RESULT

If your ColoHealth Test is negative your doctor will discuss a future screening plan that is right for you.

POSITIVE TEST RESULT

If your ColoHealth Test is positive your doctor will refer you for a follow-up colonoscopy.